Installing pagure

There are two ways to install pagure:

  • via the RPM package (recommended if you are using a RPM-based GNU/Linux distribution)
  • via the setup.py

Installing pagure via RPM

Here as well there are two ways of obtaining the RPM:

  • From the main repositories

Pagure is packaged for Fedora since Fedora 21 and is available for RHEL and its derivative via the EPEL repository <https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL>. So installing it is as easy as:

dnf install pagure pagure-milters pagure-ev pagure-webhook

or

yum install pagure pagure-milters pagure-ev pagure-webhook

The pagure package contains the core of the application and the doc server. (See the Overview page for a global overview of the structure of the project).

The pagure-milters package contains, as the name says, the milter (a mail filter to hook into a MTA).

The pagure-ev package contains the eventsource server.

The pagure-webhook package contains the web-hook server.

Note

The last three packages are optional, pagure would work fine without them but the live-update, the webhook and the comment by email services will not work.

  • From the sources

If you wish to run a newer version of pagure than what is in the repositories you can easily rebuild it as RPM.

Simply follow these steps: # Clone the sources:

git clone https://pagure.io/pagure.git

# Go to the folder:

cd pagure

# Build a tarball of the latest version of pagure:

python setup.py sdist

# Build the RPM:

rpmbuild -ta dist/pagure*.tar.gz

This will build pagure from the version present in your clone.

Once, the RPM is installed the services pagure_milter and pagure_ev are ready to be used but the database and the web-application parts still need to be configured.

Installing pagure via setup.py

Pagure includes in its sources a setup.py automating the installation of the web applications of pagure (ie: the core + the doc server).

To install pagure via this mechanism simply follow these steps: # Clone the sources:

git clone https://pagure.io/pagure.git

# Go to the folder:

cd pagure

# Install the latest version of pagure:

python setup.py build
sudo python setup.py install

Note

To install the eventsource server or the milter, refer to their respective documentations.

# Install the additional files as follow:

Source | Destination
files/pagure.cfg.sample | /etc/pagure/pagure.cfg
files/alembic.ini /etc/pagure/alembic.ini
files/pagure.conf /etc/httpd/conf.d/pagure.conf
files/pagure.wsgi /usr/share/pagure/pagure.wsgi
createdb.py /usr/share/pagure/pagure_createdb.py

Set-up pagure

Once pagure’s files are installed, you still need to set up some things.

  • Create the folder release

This folder is used by project maintainers to upload the tarball of the releases of their project.

This folder must be accessible by the user under which the application is running (in our case: git).

mkdir -p /var/www/releases
chown git:git /var/www/releases
  • Create the folders where the repos, forks and checkouts will be stored

Pagure stores the sources of a project in a git repo, offers a place to store the project’s documentation in another repo, stores a JSON dump of all issues and of all pull-requests in another two repos, and keeps a local checkout of remote projects when asked to do remote pull-requests. All these repositories are stored in different folders that must be created manually.

For example you can place them under /srv/git/repositories/ which would make /srv/git the home of your gitolite user.

You would then create the folders with:

mkdir /srv/git/repositories/{docs,forks,tickets,requests,remotes}
  • Configure apache

If installed by RPM, you will find an example apache configuration file at: /etc/httpd/conf.d/pagure.conf.

If not installed by RPM, the example file is present in the sources at: files/pagure.conf.

Adjust it for your needs.

  • Configure the WSGI file

If you installed by RPM, you will find example WSGI files at: /usr/share/pagure/pagure.wsgi for the core server and /usr/share/pagure/doc_pagure.wsgi for the doc server.

If you did not install by RPM, these files are present in the sources at: files/pagure.wsgi and files/doc_pagure.wsgi.

Adjust them for your needs

  • Give apache permission to read the repositories owned by the git user.

For the sake of this document, we assume that the web application runs under the git user, the same user as your gitolite user, but apache itself runs under the httpd (or apache2) user. So by default, apache will not be allowed to read git repositories created and managed by gitolite.

To give apache this permission (required to make git clone via http work), we use file access control lists (aka FACL):

setfacl -m user:apache:rx --default
setfacl -Rdm user:apache:rx /srv/git
setfacl -Rm user:apache:rx /srv/git

Where /srv/git is the home of your gitolite user (which will thus need to be adjusted for your configuration).

  • Set up the configuration file of pagure

This is an important step which concerns the file /etc/pagure/pagure.cfg. If you have installed pagure by RPM, this file is already there, otherwise you can find an example one in the sources at: files/pagure.cfg.sample that you will have to copy to the right location.

Confer the Configuration section of this documentation for a full explanation of all the options of pagure.

  • Create the database

You first need to create the database itself. For this, since pagure can work with: PostgreSQL, MySQL or MariaDB, we would like to invite you to consult the documentation of your database system for this operation.

Once you have specified in the configuration file the to url used to connect to the database, and create the database itself, you can now create the tables, the database scheme.

For changes to existing tables, we rely on Alembic. It uses revisions to perform the upgrades, but to know which upgrades are needed and which are already done, the current revision needs to be saved in the database. This will allow alembic to know and apply the new revision when running it.

In the alembic.ini file, one of the configuration key is most important: script_location which is the path to the versions folder containing all the alembic migration files. The sqlalchemy.url configuration key if missing will be replaced by the url filled in the configuration file of pagure.

To create the database tables, you need to run the script /usr/share/pagure/pagure_createdb.py and specify the configuration to use for pagure and for alembic.

For example:

python /usr/share/pagure/pagure_createdb.py -c /etc/pagure/pagure.cfg -i /etc/pagure/alembic.ini

This will tell /usr/share/pagure/pagure_createdb.py to use the database information specified in the file /etc/pagure/pagure.cfg and to stamp the database at the last alembic revision.

Warning

Pagure’s default configuration is using sqlite. This is fine for development purpose but not for production use as sqlite does not support all the operations needed when updating the database schema. Do use PostgreSQL, MySQL or MariaDB in production.

For changes to existing tables, we rely on Alembic. It uses revisions to perform the upgrades, but to know which upgrades are needed and which are already done, the current revision needs to be saved in the database. This will allow alembic to know apply the new revision when running it.

In the alembic.ini file, one of the configuration key is most important: script_location which is the path to the versions folder containing all the alembic migration files. The sqlalchemy.url configuration key if missing will be replaced by the url filled in the configuration file of pagure.

Warning

Calling pagure_createdb.py is asked regularly in the UPGRADING.rst documentation, especially to handle database schema changes upon upgrades, but the --initial argument should only be used the first time as it will otherwise break upgrading the database schema via alembic.

Note

When install from source the script is called createdb.py and not pagure_createdb.py.

Set up virus scanning

Pagure can automatically scan uploaded attachments for viruses using Clam. To set this up, first install clamav-data-empty, clamav-server, clamav-server-systemd and clamav-update.

Then edit /etc/freshclam.conf, removing the Example line and run freshclam once to get an up to date database.

Copy /usr/share/doc/clamav-server/clamd.conf to /etc/clamd.conf and edit that too, again making sure to remove the Example line. Make sure to set LocalSocket to a file in a directory that exists, and set User to an existing system user.

Then start the clamd service and set VIRUS_SCAN_ATTACHMENTS = True in the Pagure configuration.